NFOIC’s State FOIA Friday for September 6, 2013

From NFOIC:  A few state FOIA and local open government news items selected from many of interest that we might or might not have drawn attention to earlier in the week. While you're at it, be sure to check out State FOIA Friday Archives.

Sunshine Law proponents sue city of Groveland

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State FOIA Friday for August 16, 2013

From NFOIC:  A few state FOIA and local open government news items selected from many of interest that we might or might not have drawn attention to earlier in the week. While you're at it, be sure to check out State FOIA Friday Archives.

Indy district seeks records on takeover of schools

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Super. of Public Instruction, Wyoming gov. in records request struggle

From Wyoming Tribune Eagle Online:  Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill and the governor's office remain deadlocked in a dispute over the release of public records.

Gov. Matt Mead said again on Monday that his office will not be able to meet Hill’s request that thousands of emails from his staff be released by next week.

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SPJ letter urges Wyo. governor to support government transparency

From Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ):

INDIANAPOLIS (February 18, 2013) — Linda Petersen, SPJ Freedom of Information Committee Chair, last week wrote to Wyoming governor Matt Mead asking him to veto a bill concerning public records. The bill, HB223 Public Records — Institutions of Higher Education, would conceal from the public the search process for the University of Wyoming president. Society of Professional Journalists President Sonny Albarado also signed the letter.

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Wyoming press and government battle over open government exemptions

From WyoFile:

An analysis of public records policies within the State Integrity Investigation done by the Center for Public Integrity “reveals that, in state after state, the laws are riddled with exemptions and loopholes that often impede the public’s right to know rather than improve upon it.”

Wyoming has its share of exemptions, and open-records advocates say many of those are legitimate, but abused.

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