Kansas Lawmakers Consider Strengthening Open Government Law

Two bills before a Kansas Senate committee would make government meetings and records more accessible to the public.

Both bills were presented to the Senate Federal and State Affairs Committee last week.

Senate Bill 70 clarifies a law that requires government bodies to justify going into private meetings. Under the measure, the reason for the private meeting would have to be recorded in public minutes.

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KS: Advocates for more transparency in government testify on open records bill

Kansas news organizations and other open-government advocates came to the state Capitol on Thursday, pushing for more transparency in government meetings and reduced costs for records.

The groups are supporting Senate bills 86 and 70 in this year’s legislative session.

SB 70 clarifies what elected officials would have to tell the public when they meet in closed sessions.

SB 86 would place new limits on the prices public agencies can charge for copies of documents requested under the Kansas Open Records Act.

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NFOIC’s State FOIA Friday for July 26, 2013

From NFOIC:  A few state FOIA and local open government news items selected from many of interest that we might or might not have drawn attention to earlier in the week.

While you're at it, be sure to check out State FOIA Friday Archives.

Wisconsin DOJ sets 3 seminars on public records, meetings

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Kansas officials learn about open meetings and open records in seminar

From Garden City Telegram:  About two dozen people, mostly local government officials, attended the first of five regional training sessions designed as a primer on the Kansas Open Meetings Act and the Kansas Open Records Act. The seminar was held on Monday in the Endowment Room of the Beth Tedrow Student Center at Garden City Community College.

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End of review into Brownback’s meetings delayed

From Topeka Capital-Journal:

A district attorney’s investigation into private meetings between Republican legislators and GOP Gov. Sam Brownback won’t be finished until the end of the month because members of the governor’s staff and a few lawmakers still must be interviewed, a spokesman for the prosecutor said Tuesday.

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