Indiana State Police tracking cellphones – but won’t say how or why

From Indianapolis Star: This year, the Indiana State Police paid $373,995 for a device that law enforcement personnel have described as a powerful tool in the fight against crime and terrorism.

It could allow investigators in a surveillance vehicle to park in a crowded area and track the movements of anyone nearby with a cellphone and capture the numbers of people’s incoming and outgoing calls and text messages.

All of which concerns civil liberties and open-government groups.

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NFOIC’s State FOIA Friday for October 25, 2013

From NFOIC:  A few state FOIA and local open government news items selected from many of interest that we might or might not have drawn attention to earlier in the week. While you're at it, be sure to check out State FOIA Friday Archives.

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INDOT memo strips public info, but new IEDC rules open doors

From Republic.com:  By one stroke this year, Indiana lawmakers and the new governor vastly improved the public's ability to find out how the show is run here at the Statehouse, while in another, top managers at the Indiana Department of Transportation quietly clamped down on what's available.

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Public Access Counselor explains Indiana records laws

From Banner Graphic:

With Indiana Public Access Counselor Joe Hoage at Greencastle City Hall Thursday evening, public officials and private citizens got a lesson in Indiana’s Open Door Law and Access to Public Records Act.

Sponsored by the Greencastle League of Women Voters and the Banner Graphic, the event was designed to educate people on some of the rules and misconceptions surrounding these two laws designed to ensure transparency in public bodies.

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Indiana officials who deny access to public records now face fines

From Evansville Courier & Press:

Indiana government officials who intentionally violate public access laws now face fines of $100 for the first offense and $500 after that under a new law that took effect July 1.

The law, approved during the 2012 legislative session, was an effort to create a way to penalize those who ignore open-government laws that are already on the books.

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NFOIC’s State FOIA Friday for July 6, 2012

A few state FOIA and local open government news items selected from many of interest that we might or might not have drawn attention to earlier in the week:

Reverse surveillance: ACLU-NJ’s police tape app lets you secretly record any video interactions with cops

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