Editorial: Is The Internet Evolving Away From Freedom of Speech?

Over the last two months I have written extensively on the many ways in which the evolving and globalizing world of the Internet is shifting away from being the flag bearer of free-for-all freedom of speech and towards a moderated commercial enterprise that must mediate among conflicting global standards on acceptable speech and online conduct. What does this mean for the future of the Internet?

More

Twitter launches a political transparency page

Twitter rolled out a new page aimed at disclosing where the company stands on critical policy issues to users and Twitter’s political endeavors – including donations and Twitter’s PAC involvement.

The social networking platform has strengthened its policy division in the last several years, adding people like former FCC staffer Colin Crowell and former Google and U.S. State Department veteran Katie Jacobs Stanton. Continue…

———————

More

Judge Says USA FREEDOM Act May Scuttle Twitter’s Transparency Lawsuit

Last October, Twitter sued the Justice Department, the U.S. Attorney General, the FBI, and FBI Director James Comey, because the social media platform believed it has a First Amendment right to be fully transparent with its users about the number and nature of national security requests it receives from the government. But with the recent passing of the USA FREEDOM Act, the judge in the case says there may be no need for the lawsuit to move forward.

More

Organizing to Defend a Professor’s Freedom of Speech

On a Friday night in early August, Prof. Corey Robin put out a call on his blog. There had been plenty of grumbling over the University of Illinois's decision to revoke a job offer to Prof. Steven G. Salaita, who gained notoriety for incendiary tweets about Israel. But it had not been enough to persuade the university to reinstate Professor Salaita. So Professor Robin, a political theorist at the City University of New York's Brooklyn College, ratcheted up the pressure.

More

Fake Tweets’ Aftermath Stirs Debate About Satire, Freedom of Speech

Jon Daniel was watching cartoons with one of his sons when he created a spoof Twitter account in the name of the Peoria mayor. Out of boredom, he said, he soon began sending profane messages about sex, drugs and alcohol.

Daniel never intended for the fake account to be seen by anyone other than his friends, and it never attracted more than a few dozen followers. But within weeks the raunchy parody led to a police raid of his home and ignited a debate about online satire, free speech and the limits of a mayor's power.

More