Watermelons and National Security: Protecting U.S. Foreign Intelligence Collection from Unnecessary Disclosure

In 1966, Congress enacted the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to create a legal regime under which the American public could gain access to information about its government’s activities. In keeping with Justice Brandeis’s observation that “sunlight is the best disinfectant,” FOIA has become an invaluable tool in forcing information of national interest into the open, and of revealing instances of government waste, fraud, and abuse.

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U.S. Court of Appeals rejects CIA’s motion to squash lawsuit on Bay of Pigs history

From Global Research:

Washington, D.C. (Dec 7, 2012) – The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit yesterday rejected the CIA’s attempt to shortcut the National Security Archive’s lawsuit under the Freedom of Information Act to obtain the last still-secret history of the disastrous Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961.

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ACLU files domestic drones FOIA requests

From The American Civil Liberties Union:

On October 23, 2012, the ACLU filed Freedom of Information Act requests with five federal agencies seeking records related to the federal government’s domestic use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) – better known as drones – as well as plans for the future rollout of drones in the United States.

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The FOIA requests ask questions including:

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Does leaking secrets damage national security?

From NPR

Last week's assignment of two federal prosecutors to investigate disclosures of national security information might have been the first shot in a new war on leaks. The director of national intelligence is expected soon to announce new measures to fight unauthorized disclosures, and some members of Congress say it could be time for new anti-leaking laws.

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But advocates of open government fear an overreaction.

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