NFOIC FOI Friday for September 16 2011

September 16, 2011 5:14 PM

A few items selected from many of interest in the last few days.

The FOIA Wars: Just how open is our "open government?"

"American democracy has a disease, and it's called secrecy." So begins a July 2011 American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) report on secrecy laws and the security establishment's heavy-handed use of the classified stamp.

Visit Truthout.org for the rest.

Journalism, consumer groups protest removal of doctor information

Open government advocates urged the Obama administration [Thursday] to restore a public database of doctor discipline and malpractice records.

Visit stltoday.com for the rest.

Is open data a good idea for the Open Government Partnership?

Global Integrity is working to promote the new Open Government Partnership by serving as the OGP’s Networking Mechanism, which aims to connect aspiring OGP governments with providers of open government expertise (whether governments, civil society organizations, or private companies) to help those aspiring governments develop innovative, “stretch” open government commitments.

Visit freedominfo.org for the rest.

Don't give up openness for efficiency

When does electronic efficiency in government begin to trample on government in the sunshine? That’s one of the issues the administration of Gov. Bob McDonnell is wrestling with these days at the state capital. There is no easy answer, especially if the public wants to keep an eye on business conducted by the variety of state boards and commissions that oversee life in the Old Dominion.

Visit News & Advance for the rest.

Berlin is the first German state to launch an open government data platform

According to German entrepreneur Anke Domscheit-Berg, Berlin is the first German state to have an open data platform.

Visit gov20.govfresh for the rest.

Report: 160,000 deported without facing judge

Over the course of seven years, 160,000 immigrants have been deported without ever facing a judge, a new report (PDF) reveals. Issued by the National Immigration Law Center, the report charges that the U.S. has used something called "stipulated removal" to strong arm immigrants into signing away their due process.

Visit NPR for the rest.

Wyoming's public records law could see drastic changes

Open records proponents say proposed changes to Wyoming’s public records law are much too extreme – one expert called them a disaster - but those responsible for the draft language say the existing laws are antiquated and often cause confusion.

Visit BuffaloBulletin.com for the rest.