FOI Advocate Blog

The NFOIC open government blog is a compendium of original concepts and analysis as well as ideas, edited excerpts and materials from a variety of sources. When the information comes from another source, we will attribute it and provide a link. The blog relies on the accuracy and integrity of the original sources cited; we will correct errors and inaccuracies when we become aware of them.

For Advocate posts prior to July, 2011, visit http://foiadvocate.blogspot.com/.
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February 4, 2015 10:02 AM

"This is a place where policy is being made and we believe those discussions on policy should be made in the open," said Blair Horner, New York Public Interest Research Group legislative director.

"Requiring a slow, deliberate process to be public is sort of an unreasonable expectation in the circumstances," said political scientist Dr. Gerald Benjamin.

How transparent should government be? It’s an issue at the forefront down at the state Capitol, after a week of closed door meetings following Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s arrest. Good government groups have proposed a public forum for speaker candidates to lay out their views and visions for the Assembly. Continue>>>
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April 4, 2013 3:01 PM

From Utica Observer-Dispatch:

UTICA — School boards legally can meet in private for several reasons, including matters of security, contract agreements or to discuss pending litigation.

One thing they can’t talk about in executive session: The budget.

Yet that’s what some members of the Utica City School District Board of Education say happened Tuesday.



November 27, 2012 1:51 PM

From The Citizen:

PORT BYRON (Nov 27, 2012) - The Port Byron Teachers Association brought the state's Open Meetings Law and Freedom of Information Law guru to Port Byron High School on Monday with the goal of educating the public about the laws.

Robert Freeman, executive director of the Department of State's Committee on Open Government, visited Port Byron and drew an audience of more than 30 people from the Port Byron and other communities.

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