FOI Advocate Blog

The NFOIC open government blog is a compendium of original concepts and analysis as well as ideas, edited excerpts and materials from a variety of sources. When the information comes from another source, we will attribute it and provide a link. The blog relies on the accuracy and integrity of the original sources cited; we will correct errors and inaccuracies when we become aware of them.

For Advocate posts prior to July, 2011, visit http://foiadvocate.blogspot.com/.
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October 22, 2013 11:31 AM

From NewsWorks.org: Proposed revisions to Pennsylvania's open records law appear to require more fine-tuning as lawmakers attempt to address a surging number of requests from prison inmates.

State prisoners are among the most frequent filers when it comes to seeking documents under the state's open records law with the number of requests rising steadily since 2009. Proposed legislation calls for limiting the scope of those requests.

Visit NewsWorks.org for more.

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April 30, 2013 1:54 PM

From NewsWorks.org:

The Republican leader in the Pennsylvania Senate is taking the wraps off a wide set of proposed changes to the state Right-to-Know Law.

Sen. Dominic Pileggi's 22-page bill introduced Friday includes limits on access by inmates and new authority for the Office of Open Records to review documents in private to see if they should be released.



November 26, 2012 2:52 PM

From Beaumontenterprise.com:

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A federal appeals court has ruled in favor of the FBI's decision to redact information from records sought under the Freedom of Information Act by a Tennessee death row inmate.

Inmate Michael Dale Rimmer sued the agency over records relating to an investigation they conducted into the death of a Memphis motel clerk in 1997. Rimmer was convicted and sentenced to death for the murder of the clerk, Ricci Lynn Ellsworth, in 1998.

November 19, 2012 2:06 PM

From Daily Herald:

SALT LAKE CITY -- A state panel upheld a new policy by the Utah Department of Corrections that limits the number of documents it provides free of charge to inmates.

However, prisons must find a way for inmates to review records they can't afford to have copied, the panel said.

The ruling stemmed from an appeal filed by indigent inmate Michael Luesse, who made three record requests in May under the state's Government Records Access and Management Act. He learned more than a month later about the new policy that caps free copies at 100 pages per inmate annually.

 

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